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MAPP Plastics Discussion Forum

The MAPP Plastic Industry Discussion Forum allows members to rapidly communicate with each other. Post both questions and answers to questions that other MAPP members have about any industry topic from material and process issues to R&E Tax Credits and other business issues.

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Posted:  26 Jun 2008 22:49
Our 200 lb test corrugated boxes are collapsing in shipments to remote locations.  We fill the boxes to a maximum of 35 lbs which appears to be more than the box is capable of handling. 

Does anybody have any ideas on what may be causing our problems?

Tom Duffey
Posted:  27 Jun 2008 16:25
Are you using the same carrier for your shipments??
I would check with them first...

Also, are you filling your boxes to the top with product??  We've found that if there is a void in the box, it tends to collapse, especially if they are double stacked.

I don't know if you use UPS or not, but they have a program where they come in and analyze your packaging for you....

Brian Lesack
ATEK Plastics
Posted:  01 Jul 2008 15:04
Tom, call Dan Cunningham of Parish Manufacturing.  He has an expertise in the packaging arena that will be able to help you direct. 

Also, Matt Hlavin of Thogus Products, has done a great deal of work at solving packaging related items when it comes to packing plastics production parts.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Troy Nix
Posted:  01 Jul 2008 16:48
Tom- What is the ect of the boxes you are using?  We make similar size parts and use a 44 ect.  Our max box weight is 25lbs.  We have never had any issues.
Posted:  02 Jul 2008 22:09
Tom,

Could humidity be the culprit?  We've noticed that our boxes' ability to carry loads is greatly reduced in the summer months.  The corrugated acts as a wick in soaking up the moisture, and then loses its stiffness.  While our production area has A/C, our warehouse doesn't, and so we need to watch how high we stack the cartons during the summer months.

Mike Walter
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